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Announcing the Master Teacher Guest Blog Series!

October 22, 2015

On Tuesdays and Thursdays from now until the middle of December, the BetterLesson blog will be host to our Master Teachers, providing a platform for these talented educators to share the wisdom and insight gained through their years of experience.

Our MTs have improved over the course of their careers because they were consistently willing to try new things and adapt their practice. To help all teachers achieve the same sort of continuous improvement, BetterLesson developed TeachCycle – personalized professional development. We believe that every teacher deserves a human coach to support them just like they support their students. TeachCycle’s aim is to help teachers get better at getting better through a process of fast cycle learning- first identifying an area of student need, then trying new strategies to meet this need.

We believe that every teacher is capable of improving through TeachCycle, and we’ve distilled the key mindsets that contribute to a teacher’s TeachCycle success.

  • The recognition that, at its core, teaching is “All About the Kids”
  • A commitment to “Measure Progress” each step of the way
  • The desire to “Fail Forward” if a strategy isn’t successful, learning from it rather than being defeated by it
  • A willingness to “Reflect Honestly” on your practice
  • And lastly, an acceptance of the idea that “Learning is Social” and sharing with your colleagues will improve everyone’s learning, and thus improve student outcomes

Our Master Teachers bloggers have done this implementation/reflection process throughout their careers and are eager to share with you what they’ve learned. The first five posts in this series will focus on the TeachCycle key mindset of “All About the Kids”. Our Master Teachers will discuss the ways they have learned to personalize, engage, differentiate, and challenge all students to reach their full potential.

First up, Jennifer Valentine discusses strategies she uses to raise the rigor for her students, and   incorporate higher-order thinking into daily lessons. Enjoy!

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